Human rights activists, dissidents and journalists targeted by Pegasus spyware

Buongiorno.

Human rights lawyers, activists and dissidents across the globe were selected as possible candidates for invasive surveillance via their phones, leaked phone data suggests.

The Guardian’s Pegasus project reveals that their mobile phone numbers appeared in leaked records, indicating they were selected prior to possible surveillance targeting by governmental clients of the Israeli company NSO Group, which developed the Pegasus spyware.

NSO has repeatedly insisted that Pegasus is meant to be used only to spy on terrorists and serious criminals. The tool can extract messages, photos and emails, record calls and secretly activate microphones.

NSO has claimed it will cut off clients if they misuse Pegasus. In un response to the consortium, it denied the leaked records were evidence of targeting with Pegasus and said it “will continue to investigate all credible claims of misuse and take appropriate action based on the result of these investigations”.

Joe Biden may have promised to use his presidency to “restore the soul of America” and to unite the nation, defuse “anger, resentment and hatred” and lead Americans back to a world where they treated “each other with dignity and respect”.

But six months on, Biden’s assurances are at risk of appearing overly romantic. Di 1,400 miles west from the White House, in Dallas, Texas, people who had been hoping for change are witnessing an explosion of regressive, extreme rightwing laws pushed through by the state’s Republicans, Ed Pilkington writes.

The Bootleg Fire, the largest wildfire in the US, torched more dry forest landscape in Oregon on Sunday, one of at least 70 major blazes burning across the west and nearby states.

The wildfire, which is raging just north of the California border, grew to more than 476 sq miles (1,210 sq km), an area about the size of Los Angeles.

A joint indagine by the Guardian and Food and Water Watch shows that a handful of mega firms dominate every link of the food supply chain: from seeds and fertilizers to slaughterhouses and supermarkets to cereals and beers, US consumers are almost entirely at the mercy of a few huge companies when buying food.

Workers at Hufcor, a family-owned company founded in Janesville, Wisconsin, 120 anni fa, are fighting the closure of the plant and the moving of operations to Monterrey, Messico, which is wiping out the jobs of 166 lavoratori. Their opponent? The private-equity firm OpenGate Capital, which acquired the company four years ago and which, according to the Wisconsin senator Tammy Baldwin, “has a history of shutting down businesses and giving workers pink slips in Wisconsin”.

Covering the climate crisis is one of the most important things we do at the Guardian. So today we’re introducing Climate Check, a new First Thing section to help you stay on top of the environmental stories that matter the most. Today, we thought we’d bring to your attention that the American Petroleum Institute, a powerful US lobby group, receives millions from oil companies to help big oil block climate action. My colleague Chris McGreal reports.

Once a symbol of individualism, many tattoos are now far from unique. What happens when you walk into a tattoo parlour and come out with someone else’s inky ornament on your arm after a quick Google of “cool tattoos men”? James Shackell knows.

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